Law's abnegation : from law's empire to the administrative state /

"Ronald Dworkin once imagined law as an empire and judges as its princes. But over time, the arc of law has bent steadily toward deference to the administrative state. Adrian Vermeule argues that law has freely abandoned its imperial pretensions, and has done so for internal legal reasons. In a...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Vermeule, Adrian, 1968-
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2016
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001 946975321
003 OCoLC
005 20190701030341.0
008 160512s2016 mau b 001 0 eng c
010 |a 2016015023 
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040 |a MH/DLC  |b eng  |e rda  |c HLS  |d DLC  |d YDXCP  |d BDX  |d OCLCF  |d YDX  |d ONS  |d CLU  |d OCLCO  |d OCLCQ  |d DHA  |d OCLCQ  |d UKMGB 
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049 |a VLAM 
050 0 0 |a KF5425  |b .V47 2016 
100 1 |a Vermeule, Adrian,  |d 1968- 
245 1 0 |a Law's abnegation :  |b from law's empire to the administrative state /  |c Adrian Vermeule 
260 |a Cambridge, Massachusetts :  |b Harvard University Press,  |c 2016 
300 |a 254 pages ;  |c 25 cm 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and indexes 
505 0 |a Introduction : the abnegation of law's empire -- The legality of administrative law -- Separation of powers without idolatry -- Deference and due process -- Rationally arbitrary decisions -- Thin rationality review : Appendix 190 -- How law empowers nonlawyers -- Conclusion : law on the margin 
520 |a "Ronald Dworkin once imagined law as an empire and judges as its princes. But over time, the arc of law has bent steadily toward deference to the administrative state. Adrian Vermeule argues that law has freely abandoned its imperial pretensions, and has done so for internal legal reasons. In area after area, judges and lawyers, working out the logical implications of legal principles, have come to believe that administrators should be granted broad leeway to set policy, determine facts, interpret ambiguous statutes, and even define the boundaries of their own jurisdiction. Agencies have greater democratic legitimacy and technical competence to confront many issues than lawyers and judges do. And as the questions confronting the state involving climate change, terrorism, and biotechnology (to name a few) have become ever more complex, legal logic increasingly indicates that abnegation is the wisest course of action"--  |c Provided by publisher 
650 0 |a Judicial review of administrative acts  |z United States 
907 |a .b2405891 
998 |a secnd 
999 |c 114370 
852 |a Law Library  |b Second Floor  |h KF5425 .V47 2016  |p 33940004511984