Privatising the public university : the case law /

"Privatising the Public University: The Case of Law is the first full-length critical study examining the impact of the dramatic reforms that have swept through universities over the last two decades. Drawing on extensive research and interviews in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Canada, Mar...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Thornton, Margaret
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Routledge, 2012
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008 111103s2012 enk b 001 0 eng
010 |a 2011009026 
020 |a 9780415677899 (hardback) 
020 |a 0415677890 (hardback) 
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035 |a (SKY)244684366 
040 |a DLC  |c DLC  |d YDX  |d BTCTA  |d YDXCP  |d CDX  |d BWK  |d BWX 
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050 0 0 |a K100  |b .T486 2012 
100 1 |a Thornton, Margaret 
245 1 0 |a Privatising the public university :  |b the case law /  |c Margaret Thornton 
260 |a Abingdon, Oxon ;  |a New York :  |b Routledge,  |c 2012 
300 |a xxi, 270 p. ;  |c 25 cm 
500 |a 'A GlassHouse book' 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index 
505 0 |a The political economy of higher education -- The market comes to law school -- Jettisoning the critical -- Governance and academic life -- Research in the corporatized university -- Conclusion 
520 |a "Privatising the Public University: The Case of Law is the first full-length critical study examining the impact of the dramatic reforms that have swept through universities over the last two decades. Drawing on extensive research and interviews in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Canada, Margaret Thornton considers the impact of the market on students, academics and law schools, documenting how both the curriculum and pedagogical methods have changed. If the passing of the idea of the university is rued, concern usually focuses on the humanities and the natural sciences. In this respect, law has been regarded as privileged because of the virtually unstoppable demand for law places and the willingness of students to pay high fees. And, as this book shows, it is commercial and instrumental forms of legal training that are now favoured, whilst the humanistic, critical, theoretical and social justice aspects of legal knowledge have now been corroded. Privatising the Public University will be of considerable interest to legal academics; but it will also be invaluable work for anyone interested in the future of higher education"--  |c Provided by publisher 
650 0 |a Law schools  |z Commonwealth countries 
650 0 |a Law  |x Study and teaching  |z Commonwealth countries 
907 |a .b2167657 
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999 |c 101040 
852 |a Law Library  |b Lower Level  |h K100 .T486 2012  |p 33940004188510