Private wrongs /

From the perspective of prominent positions in both moral philosophy and legal scholarship, tort law can seem baffling: people are made to pay damages when they are barely or not at fault, yet some serious harms go uncompensated. Many of these puzzles grow out of the assumption that the law's c...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Ripstein, Arthur
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2016
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001 925784150
003 OCoLC
005 20180625041550.0
008 151013s2016 mau b 001 0 eng c
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020 |a 9780674659803 
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040 |a MH/DLC  |b eng  |e rda  |c HLS  |d DLC  |d YDXCP  |d BTCTA  |d BDX  |d GWL  |d CDX  |d ILI  |d WEA  |d LRL  |d QGK  |d OCLCQ  |d OCLCF  |d UX0 
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049 |a VLAM 
050 0 0 |a K923  |b .R57 2016 
100 1 |a Ripstein, Arthur, 
245 1 0 |a Private wrongs /  |c Arthur Ripstein 
260 |a Cambridge, Massachusetts :  |b Harvard University Press,  |c 2016 
300 |a xiv, 313 pages ;  |c 24 cm 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index 
505 0 |a Introduction : retrieving the idea of a private wrong -- What you already have, Part I : your body and property -- Using what you have : misfeasance and nonfeasance -- Wrongdoing for which the offender must pay : negligence -- Use what is yours in a way that does not harm your neighbor : strict liability -- A malicious wrong in its strict legal sense : motive and intention in tort law -- What you already have, Part II : your own good name -- Remedies, Part I : as if it had never happened -- Remedies, Part II : before a court -- Conclusion : horizontal and vertical 
520 |a From the perspective of prominent positions in both moral philosophy and legal scholarship, tort law can seem baffling: people are made to pay damages when they are barely or not at fault, yet some serious harms go uncompensated. Many of these puzzles grow out of the assumption that the law's concern must either be to compensate losses or penalize misconduct. In private wrongs, Arthur Ripstein provides a philosophical and systematic account of the rights protected by tort law. The law of tort protects what people already have: their person, understood as bodily integrity and reputation, and property. Ripstein articulates the form of these rights, and provides a simple but compelling explanation of the sense in which the point of damages is to make it as if the wrong had never happened. He explains why this matters even though damages are at best an imperfect substitute and why enforcing private rights is consistent with the other activities of a liberal state without being reducible to them.--Publisher's information 
650 0 |a Torts  |x Philosophy 
907 |a .b2326735 
998 |a lower 
999 |c 126676 
852 |a Law Library  |b Lower Level  |h K923 .R57 2016  |p 33940004441307